Information

The full set of documents is on the City of York Council Website. All the documents can be found at:

City of York Local Plan

A copy of the plan is also available in Dunnington library.

Local Plan

The Local Plan was submitted to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on Friday 25th May for independent examination. Independent Planning Inspectors have been appointed to carry out an independent examination of the Local Plan and Polices Maps and determine whether they are sound, legally compliant and fulfil the duty to cooperate.

Parish Council Response to the Published Local Plan
May 2018

The Parish Council has been involved at every stage of this process and we have commented on all previous drafts. This final plan has taken into account our representations. We do not support any developments which have been rejected with reasons within the plan and do not accept they are reasonable alternative sites. We strongly agree with the reasons given in the plan for their rejection. It is to be greatly welcomed that an indisputable Greenbelt is to be established around Dunnington. We support this strongly and look forward to it being established as early as possible. The openness of the approach as you enter Dunnington from any direction and the rural setting of Dunnington are important to the amenity of the village and its residents.

Housing Sites

H31 Eastfield Lane While the development of H31 is not welcome, as the access to the village centre, to the school, to public transport and other amenities along Eastfield Lane is narrow and the junction of Eastfield Lane and Church Balk is not suitable to cater for the inevitable significant increase in vehicular traffic it is recognised that this is the least worst option of the sites previously proposed. It ‘squares off’ the village and removes the less than attractive features of one part of the site. It is to be welcomed that the previously safeguarded land adjacent has not been retained. This in turn will allow the rural entrance from the east end of Eastfield Lane to remain unaltered. This maintains the openness of the approach to the village and consequently the roadway at this point must not widened but continue as is to discourage traffic from using it as a shortcut from the A166 through to the A1079. It is recognised that Eastfield Lane will need a footpath along the south side for the length of H31but not beyond. It is to be greatly welcomed that an indisputable Greenbelt is to be established around Dunnington. We support this strongly and look forward to it being established as early as possible. The openness of the approach as you enter Dunnington from any direction and the rural setting of Dunnington are important to the amenity of the village and its residents.

The north side along its whole length to its junction with Church Balk is generally hedged close to the road and should remain untouched taking into account its historic nature and environmental importance. There are significant drainage problems in the village and any such significant development will have to ensure that it does not exacerbate the severe surface water drainage problems currently experienced in times of heavy rain storms. It must therefore meet the highest standards possible as far as drainage is concerned. Water pressure in that part of the village is very low and may cause problems for the rest of the village if no action is taken to improve it. The proposed increase in housing density from the previous plan is to be regretted as this is likely to reduce the quality of the housing leading to an overcrowding of the site, lack of green space, the loss of the opportunity for a mixture of housing (which we believe is very important) while at the same reducing the number of larger and more distinctive properties. Any development here will also have to deal with the inevitable shortage of school places, play areas and other green spaces within the village arising from such an increase in population numbers.

H9 Land to west of Common Road Dunnington is a green wedge between the industrial estate and the residential part of the village and defines clearly the south boundary of the village. It is very important for the setting of the village. The open and rural aspect of one of the three main gateways to the village would be lost with any development in this field. The field abuts Hassacarr Nature Reserve and contains a three metre dyke through which most of the surface water runoff from the Village passes, is at risk of flooding, is partly Zone 1 and Zone3 and it also has ecological and conservation significance. This piece of land has always been considered as greenbelt and has been turned down for development in the past. Any development in Zone1 only would not fit well with the urban form of Dunnington in terms of structured residential development and would offer no identifiable or logical boundaries.

H827, the Water Tower Land. Eastfield Lane forms a clear and well defined boundary for the northern edge of the village. The open aspect at one of the three main gateways to the village emphasizes and confirms its rural character and provides a significant visual amenity as one enters the village. This land is part of the York moraine and is currently productive agricultural land and is within the proposed Greenbelt and has always been treated as Greenbelt for development control. Inclusion of this land for development would compromise defensible Green Belt boundaries. Any additional housing in this location would potentially make the already precarious surface water drainage issue for the village much worse. The development of this site will impact the junction of Church Balk/Eastfield Lane which is already problematic.

H748 Adjacent Stamford Bridge Road This is on open land beyond the edge of the village. This land is currently agricultural and not suitable for development as it is in the green belt and will impact adversely on the setting of the village. It is beyond the built up area of the village. It would not fit well with the urban form of Dunnington in terms of structured residential development and would offer no identifiable or logical boundaries. It will also coalesce with the A166.

H738 Land to South side of Intake Lane. This is on open land beyond the edge of the village. This land is currently agricultural and not suitable for development as it is in the green belt and will impact adversely on the setting of the village. It is beyond the built up area of the village. It would not fit well with the urban form of Dunnington in terms of structured residential development and would offer no identifiable or logical boundaries

H72, the Water Tower Land. Eastfield Lane forms a clear and well defined boundary for the northern edge of the village. The open aspect at one of the three main gateways to the village emphasizes and confirms its rural character and provides a significant visual amenity as one enters the village. This land is part of the York moraine and is currently productive agricultural land and is within the proposed Greenbelt and has always been treated as Greenbelt for development control. Inclusion of this land for development would compromise defensible Green Belt boundaries. Any additional housing in this location would potentially make the already precarious surface water drainage issue for the village much worse. The development of this site will impact the junction of Church Balk/Eastfield Lane which is already problematic.

H737 Stockhill Field This is on open land beyond the edge of the village. This land is currently agricultural and not suitable for development as it is in the green belt and will impact adversely on the setting of the village. It is beyond the built up area of the village. It would not fit well with the urban form of Dunnington in terms of structured residential development and would offer no identifiable or logical boundaries. It will also coalesce with the A166.

H899 York Road This land is in the greenbelt. This site is outside the existing settlement limits and its development would adversely impact on the character and setting of the village particularly on one of the main approaches to the village.

The Local Plan was submitted to the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government on Friday 25th May for independent examination. Independent Planning Inspectors have been appointed to carry out an independent examination of the Local Plan and Policies Maps and determine whether they are sound, legally compliant and fulfil the duty to cooperate.
July 2018